Archive for May, 2009

May 8, 2009

Trivia time #37

trivia37

Ramanand Sagar made many “Jubilee” hits in the 1960s, including Geet, Aarzoo, Aankhen and Kohinoor. He also made a television series out of the Ramayana, which became such a smashing success that the streets were empty when it aired.

Can anyone tell me the name of his younger brother, who is still active in the film industry today?

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May 6, 2009

In which I am besharam

A memsaab in the May 13 issue of Filmfare! (Previously they have featured Beth, Filmi Girl, the P-PCC, So They Dance and The Bollywood Fan—have I missed anyone?)¬†

memsaabstory_filmfare

(A gazillion thanks to Banno for scanning and sending it to me!)

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May 4, 2009

Oonche Log (1965)

oonchelog

Now and then a film comes along that gives the viewer true insight into the time and place in which it is set. I’m not talking about flowered go-go boots or violently patterned wallpaper here, but about a look at the generation that is passing and the one taking its place; about moving forward and looking back, and setting a course for the future. Most of the tributes to Feroz Khan that I’ve read in the week since his death have mentioned Oonche Log as the movie that established him in his career, and I can certainly see why. He holds his own with ease opposite two established and charismatic actors, Ashok Kumar and Raaj Kumar, in a complex and layered story requiring skillful, nuanced performances (there are very few characters).

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May 2, 2009

Panch Ratan (1965)

panchratan_candy

I couldn’t resist this film when I saw it: Randhawa! I figured Dara Singh’s brother (and Mumtaz’s brother-in-law) would not star in a film that didn’t have men in tights wrestling with each other. I did not expect (and did not get) world-class acting, but I did hope for a fairly entertaining swashbuckler and enough large half-naked men grappling with each other to keep me happy. And in that, the film does deliver in spades. Randhawa is even more wooden than his brother (and somehow less charismatic), but he is equally excellent eye candy. The story is as cartoonish and silly as anyone could hope for, and the songs (by Anu Malik’s underrated father Sardar Malik) are oodles of fun.¬†Madhumati and our beloved Laxmi Chhaya provide dancing entertainment—that in itself is worth the price of admission.

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